Veresdale Equine Veterinary Services

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  • Thank you so much for coming out to stitch my poor horse up this morning! It is the second time that I have had to call and get someone out and the service has been wonderful...and my horse is looking and feeling a lot better. - Jennie from Cedar Grove

  • Dr David Barthomomuez is brilliant. Yes I am totally biased but it is based on my experience over the last 6 wks with my mare Rivver. Treatment is still on going and I get the pleasure of picking David's brain for lots of horsey info when he does his weekly visit! I am very impressed with the way David handles and treats my mare, he genuinely cares. The girls in the office have also been wonderful to deal with. Keep up the great work team Vevs! - Cindi from Tamborine Village

  • "Thank you for your after-care service, I am very very impressed to say the least. The phone call from you today following up on my horses progress has won my business."

    - Sue from Gardenvale Stud

  • "Thanks to Dr David for helping my old man feel better... I would recommend this veterinary clinic to anyone, and I wouldn't use any other vet."

    -Nelly from Munruben

  • "I cannot fault their willingness to assist you as soon as possible, their capacity to prioritise so the most urgent animals are attended to quickly, their gentle way with horses, their knowledge and their reasonable prices..." - Sharon from Cedar Grove

  • "Thanks so much to Dr Dave and the team for all your hard work with getting Karrie in foal!!! We are very grateful and couldn't have done it without you guys!" - Lynette from Logan Village
  • "Your patience and gentle nature were greatly appreciated by both of us. Thank you." - Karen from Jimboomba

  • "Our family would like to give a big thank you and hug to Dr David, Kelly & all the team at Veresdale Equine Veterinary Services for saving our dog sid from a brown snake bite. Without their caring services I dont think sid would of made it, thanks guys. " - Hurchalla Family

  • "David and his team treat their client’s animals as if they were their own and have helped me and my horses in some very stressful situations over the years, thankfully, always with a excellent outcome!" - Toni from Jimboomba
  • "Thank you so much for the extra good care you took of Lilly ... I’ve always been extremely happy with Dave as our vet, I think he truly does a wonderful job, and you can really see how much he cares.” - Tania Banek

  • "The fact that Dave has been my vet for many years speaks volumes.  Dave has a very nice manner and deals with the horses in a calm and kind way.  He always takes time to explain options and procedures and to advise on what he considers to be the best course of treatment." - Gillian Coote
  • "Although we may have moved, we would not consider using any other veterinarian other than David to care for our horses." – Brett and Danielle from Wonglepong

  • "David has been my vet now for several years. Over that time with the highs and lows of my veterinary needs, David has always been compassionate, caring and friendly." - Marnie Wilmott

  • "We really appreciate David's practical, no-nonsense approach to everything, his vast knowledge and his abilities."

    – Marty & Danielle at North Maclean

  • "We feel that the care David shows our horses is the same as if they were his own."

    Weownna Warmbloods

  • "We have been using Dr "Bart" since we bought our first two ponies for our girls 6 years ago. He has always given us great advice and service over the years." – B & G Russell

  • "At VEVS, I always get the right advice, which means I’ve always gotten the right result"

    – Peter @ Acton Classical Equitation

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Lice and Horses

Written by Dr Kylie Schaaf (hons) BSc (Vet) (hons) FANCVS (Eq Surgery) Board Certified Surgeon.

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Horses are affected by two species of lice, the sucking louse (Haematopinus asini) and the biting louse (Damalinia equi). Horse sucking lice are the more common louse species infesting horses. The adult lice lay their eggs on the horse hair, which hatch into nymphs in approximately 1 week. It takes approximately 3 weeks before the nymphs mature into adults. Nymphs appear as a smaller version of adult lice and feed on the horse the same way as the adults do. Sucking lice are usually found in the mane, forelock, tail base and around the coronary bands. Biting lice are usually found on the body, mainly the backline, head, neck and flanks. Severe infestations may involve the whole body and can even be serious enough to result in anaemia. The lice are easily visualized in heavy infestations, lighter infestations can be more tricky to identify. It is important to quickly lift up or part the mane hair or forelock as lice quickly move away from the exposed area. The horse biting louse is approximately 3mm long, reddish-brown in colour, with a yellow and brown striped abdomen. The horse sucking louse is just under 3mm long and is grey coloured with a broad abdomen and narrow head.
Lice feed on sloughed skin, hair, and skin secretions. This causes a stark, roughened coat, skin irritation, itching and self mutilation. There is usually significant hair loss due to the horse rubbing and scratching. Infection is predominantly in winter and spring as long winter coats and lack of rugging and grooming predispose horses to infestation. Lice are spread between horses through direct physical contact, or indirectly through grooming equipment or tack, or the environment. Lice can only survive a few days in the environment, as they need to feed from horses to survive. Horses that are old, in poor condition or immune-compromised are more susceptible to infection. Lice are species specific and therefore humans and other animals can not be infected with horse lice.
Lice are usually readily controlled with insecticides, however, it is important to also address underlying predisposing factors such as poor body condition. All horses should be treated and re-examined in 2 weeks to check that newly hatched lice are not developing. It is also important that contaminated gear is treated and equipment is not used for this period, as lice do not survive in the environment. There is a pour-on treatment available for horses. Care should be taken if the skin is significantly broken or irritated as severe inflammation can result. Horses should be checked again 1-2 months after application as this treatment works by retarding the growth of the developing lice rather than by a direct kill. Cattle or sheep pour-on medications are not recommended for horses as they can result in severe inflammation.

lice1Horses are affected by two species of lice, the sucking louse (Haematopinus asini) and the biting louse (Damalinia equi). Horse sucking lice are the more common louse species infesting horses. The adult lice lay their eggs on the horse hair, which hatch into nymphs in approximately 1 week.

 It takes approximately 3 weeks before the nymphs mature into adults. Nymphs appear as a smaller version of adult lice and feed on the horse the same way as the adults do. Sucking lice are usually found in the mane, forelock, tail base and around the coronary bands. Biting lice are usually found on the body, mainly the backline, head, neck and flanks. Severe infestations may involve the whole body and can even be serious enough to result in anaemia. The lice are easily visualized in heavy infestations, lighter infestations can be more tricky to identify. It is important to quickly lift up or part the mane hair or forelock as lice quickly move away from the exposed area. The horse biting louse is approximately 3mm long, reddish-brown in colour, with a yellow and brown striped abdomen. The horse sucking louse is just under 3mm long and is grey coloured with a broad abdomen and narrow head. 

 


Lice feed on sloughed skin, hair, and skin secretions. This causes a stark, roughened coat, skin irritation, itching and self mutilation. There is usually significant hair loss due to the horse rubbing and scratching. Infection is predominantly in winter and spring as long winter coats and lack of rugging and grooming predispose horses to infestation. Lice are spread between horses through direct physical contact, or indirectly through grooming equipment or tack, or the environment. Lice can only survive a few days in the environment, as they need to feed from horses to survive. Horses that are old, in poor condition or immune-compromised are more susceptible to infection. Lice are species specific and therefore humans and other animals can not be infected with horse lice. 


lice2Lice are usually readily controlled with insecticides, however, it is important to also address underlying predisposing factors such as poor body condition. All horses should be treated and re-examined in 2 weeks to check that newly hatched lice are not developing. It is also important that contaminated gear is treated and equipment is not used for this period, as lice do not survive in the environment. There is a pour-on treatment available for horses. Care should be taken if the skin is significantly broken or irritated as severe inflammation can result. Horses should be checked again 1-2 months after application as this treatment works by retarding the growth of the developing lice rather than by a direct kill. Cattle or sheep pour-on medications are not recommended for horses as they can result in severe inflammation.

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